CHASING SATURN
Statistics show that over 33% of the women living in the United States have experienced domestic violence. Child abuse statics run slightly less from 10-28%. On a global level, statistics reveal that 40 million children are subjected to abuse each year. It is a cycle that repeats itself from generation to generation. It permeates every aspect of life, in every culture, in every financial bracket. Now, given the recent election in the US, and attacks on women's rights here and abroad, matters could very well get worse. In other parts of the world, it has been a brutal fact of life for decades, if not longer. That is my launching point for Chasing Saturn.

The project history is based on personal experience. Being exposed to both domestic violence and child abuse at a very early age it is a theme that occasionally surfaces in my work. I recall clearly the first time I saw as a young student the Goya painting Saturno Devorando a Su Hijo. It was both gristly, and hauntingly familiar. I have been intrigued by this legend ever since, not only for its gruesome violence, but also for themes of rebirth and victory.

Chasing Saturn is where personal memories and dreams are wrapped into the mythology of the Roman/Greek deity. First, in a three part series, it looks at the consort and children of Saturn and the abuses sustained at the hands of an abusive patriarch. Images of offspring Hestia, the eldest daughter-child, virgin goddess of the hearth, through Jupiter – the avenger, as well as Rhea herself, are imagined first hand as they face the wrath of Saturn.   It is a series that interprets as well, contemplates the current political trend to demonize, demean, victimize and objectify women.

This project looks at the state of affairs of domestic violence, never an easy topic to discuss, with survivors or the general population, yet it is through this artwork that I would like to open a dialogue by interpreting the problem through mythology – and hopefully help others come to terms with their experience and break the cycle of violence.

Select images have been published in the Tulane Review, the Calyx Journal and the Temenos Journal and have been exhibited in counjunction with the Domestic Volence Network at the Athenaeum Foundation in Indianapolis in 2016.